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As with all links we provide we only agree with that which is in agreement with the Bible at the sites where the URLs point. A Commentary or Exposition upon the Books of Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job and Psalms, wherein the text is explained, some controversies are discussed, sundry cases of conscience are cleared, and many remarkable matters hinted, that had by former interpreters been pretermitted.

In all which divers other texts of Scripture, which occasionally are fully opened, and the whole so intermixed with pertinent histories, as will yield both pleasure and profit to the judicious reader. Also includes "God's Love Tokens, and The Afflicted Man's Lessons, brought to light and laid before him in two fruitful and seasonable discourses upon Rev , comforting under and directing unto a right use of our personal and public crosses and calamities.

PDF Matthew Pooles Commentary on the Holy Bible - Book of 1st Samuel (Annotated)

A Commentary upon the Books of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Songs, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, and Daniel wherein the text is explained, some controversies are discussed, divers common-places are handled, and many remarkable matters hinted, that had by former interpreters been pretermitted, Besides sundry other texts of Scripture which occasionally occur are fully opened, and the whole so intermixed with pertinent histories, as will yield both pleasure and profit to the judicious reader.

A Commentary, or Exposition Upon the 12 Minor Prophets Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi , wherein the text is explained, some controversies are discussed, sundry cases of conscience are cleared, and many remarkable matters hinted, that had by former interpreters been pretermitted. In all which diverse texts of Scripture which occasionally occur, are fully opened, and the whole so intermixed with pertinent histories, as will yield both pleasure and profit to the judicious reader.

Besides, divers other texts of Scripture, which occasionally occur, are fully opened, and the whole so intermixed with pertinent histories, as will yield both pleasure, and profit to the judicious reader. Painfully and carefully extracted and distilled into a decade of divine discourses, by way of exercitation, essay, or common-place. Click here to download.

JOEL R.

However, as that Divine Book rests, as it were, locked up in an ark of languages, languages not commonly known, it abounds as well in difficulties, difficulties neither few nor small; neither is it to be denied that there are many obscurities and ambiguities, whether in the words or in the sense, which men, either muddled and twisted in mind or corrupted in manners, readily pervert into opinions not so very false, but still ruinous.

Nothing can be more desirable to all those, to whom everlasting salvation is made dear to the heart, than to have this Book opened, which remains sealed to the majority of mortals, whether through ignorance or their own sloth, and to find a reliable guide or interpreter, who might open to souls, souls wandering through wastelands of errors, the true and safe path pointed out in the Sacred Volumes.

Moreover, knowledge of the Sacred Scriptures, as it is most useful, and in a certain measure necessary, to all Christians, so also and especially to theologians and ministers of the Church; in whom ignorance of the Scriptures is a most grave sin, and certainly scandalous; out of which, as out of a fountain, almost all fantasies and plagues, either of opinions or of traditions, rushed forth, all which undermined and ruined the present state of both the Church and the ministry.

This is certainly one origin of errors, and perhaps the principal origin, at least in men that are not malignant, for most true overseers of souls would not find it so difficult to know the entirety of the Sacred Books that they, being content to learn some bits of them insofar as the course of studies and sermons requires , would gladly pass over the remainders ungreeted, as if God would have written something which would not need to be understood, or as if there might be a class of men whom He might have burdened to a greater degree, first to understand, then to explain, the Sacred, and indeed the whole, Scripture as much as it is possible, through the weakness of human ability and the preoccupations of its function , than those whom the Divine Majesty has established as interpreters of His will.

And if it is true which is indeed most true that the Sacred Text is the best interpreter of itself, and that the comparison of passages is preeminently useful in the mutual understanding of them, it is inevitable that they would slip into many errors, who, with that most fair framework of Scripture neglected, examine some parts of it exclusively, parts torn from the remainder. So that one might resist these and innumerable other evils, the learned and pious men in former generations of the Church applied their hands and minds to this work, with the result that they were conferring, by means of their laborious studies, the Sacred Scripture, or some part of it, unfolded.

For this reason, there is so great a crowd of commentators, particularly in these latter generations of the Church, to which generations, by divine mercy alone, this blessedness arose in the midst of many calamities, with the result that the brightness of heavenly truth was shining forth more brilliantly, and the words and sense of the Holy Spirit in the Biblical Books were being thoroughly investigated and more solidly explained than had been granted in most of the preceding ages.

Nevertheless, it is not to be denied that, among the most learned and painstaking commentaries of certain commentators, commentaries most worthy even of cedar and marble, a considerable amount of rubbish from other commentators creeps in, worthy of the leisure only of the author himself and of his squandering reader, which were not so much being worn by the hands of the most studious as they were becoming prey to moths.

And the multitude of interpreters is perhaps not less detrimental to the Church, or at least to the studies of theologians, than the multitude of doctors was once to Hadrian.

Hadrian quotes the popular saying: "The multitude of physicians has slain a king. Furthermore, since many candidates for theology are destitute either of the knowledge of the field so that they might discern the best interpreters, or of the judgment by which they might select the best, or of the endowment by which they might purchase them, or of the time or inclination by which they might diligently and fruitfully read them; it is unavoidable that the acquisition of sound knowledge of the entire Sacred Text be of very great exertion and of the highest difficulty.

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In addition, pondering the tendencies and methods of the commentators, I appear to have detected more than a few errors in many of them: these, by their prolixity, overwhelm and weary readers; those, by their brevity, envelope and conceal the sense: these, indifferent with respect to words and phrases; those, not discerning with respect to substantial matters especially with respect to difficult and obscure matters, which chiefly call for the labor of the interpreter ; these overflow in superfluities; those lack in necessities; most stuff each page of their books, not so much with their own thoughts, as with the interpretations of others a thousand times repeated.

This I had often in my prayers, that someone skilled in the authors and issues and gifted with incisive judgment might undertake this work. Having been for a long time frustrated in this expectation, and burning with a most ardent desire for this kind of resource, since all others were drawing back from the charge as extremely difficult, I, however inferior, preferred to undertake it myself, rather than to have it undertaken by no one.

To them I opened my mind quite fully; I revealed the authors chiefly out of whom I was desiring to compose my work; and I likewise exhibited a kind of rough outline of my plan. When I had thought the outline to have received sufficient approval from them, being confident of the counsels and encouragements of them, I set forth my hand with God to this good work; and I committed the autograph [i. How favorable and candid have been the judgments of the professors and other theologians, first native, and then foreign, concerning this autograph!

Not a few published their complimentary testimonies of them, far above my deserving and hope; others likewise conferred their approbation by most lengthy letters of favor given unto me, and they have been actively encouraging me unto the undertaking of the work, liberally promising their influence, if ever it should be of use. Urged on by their authority, and confident in divine aid, I eagerly undertook my plan, and after various inconveniences to which it is not desirable here to refer , I have at last, although later than I had wished and hoped, brought to completion the first volume.

But how many know that the majority of his literary works were in Latin, and that only recently has work been begin to translate them into English?

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Steven Dilday, a pastor in the Presbyterian Reformed Church of America, is an expert in Latin; and he is currently engaged in this massive translation work. Pastor Dilday can also be contacted from that website. The material below has been included here with the permission of pastor Dilday. It is mostly from the Matthew Poole Project website.

Edited by George Godfrey Cunningham. III, pp.

Preface to Poole's "Annotations": History of Bible Annotations

Matthew Poole, M. Born A. Died A. Mr Poole's other works are the following: 1. The Blasphemer slain with the sword of the Spirit. A model for maintaining students in the university. A Letter to Lord C.

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If it had pleased God to have lent a little longer life to our reverend brother, the work had very probably been done to greater advantage, and more general satisfaction. We are but entered upon his harvest, and have wanted his sickle; we cannot pretend to any double portion of his spirit. His mantle dropped from him before he was translated we mean his Synopsis.

We have taken that up; out of that great work of his we have taken so much as we judged proper for his design in this work, and made use of great number of other authors, some of which he left out, or very little considered, in his Synopsis , upon design to make a further use of them in this English work, as thinking their labours more proper for this than his other work. Our design, good reader, was not to tell thee how the fathers interpreted texts, Aquinas, [11] Justinianus, [12] and others have done that work, nor yet to tell thee any grammatical niceties, or what learned men have critically noted upon terms or phrases, that is done in the Synopsis Criticorum , nor yet to tell thee what conclusions of truth may be raised from the verses, that hath been done profitably upon many books of Scripture by Mr.

Dickson, [13] Hutchinson, [14] Fergusson, [15] Guild, [16] Durham, [17] and some others, much less to handle the controversies that have risen from any portion of Scripture.

He wrote a commentary on the Song of Solomon. Who else but He is capable? Although he never left the Roman Church, he sought the reformation of its corruptions, and he contributed greatly to the Reformation through the production of his various editions of the Greek New Testament.

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He was certainly one of the greatest and most influential scholars of his time. The English Annotations are more accurately described as a production commissioned by Parliament which included the work of some members of that august Assembly. The remaining books are thought to have been completed by John Downham and John Reading, and the overall production was supervised by John Downham.

He published his annotations in Italian in , and they were translated into English in He wrote on much of the Bible, gathering together the comments, observations, and interpretations of the Fathers. He was the first to occupy a chair of Hebrew and Arabic at the University of Paris, and he devoted himself to the production of a Polyglot Bible. Guistiniani perished at sea in , and only the Psalter portion of his polyglot was published; it included the Hebrew text, the Septuagint translation, the Chaldean paraphrase, an Arabic version, the Vulgate translation, a new Latin translation, a Latin translation of the Chaldean, and a collection of Patristic scholia.

Dickson served his church as a minister and Professor of Divinity at Glasgow and at Edinburgh. He was ejected in , after the Restoration, and he died later that same year. He wrote commentaries on the Song of Songs and Revelation. He served as a minister and Professor of Divinity at Glasgow.